Swim With Safety

With the school year coming to an end, summer is in full swing. Pools are a large part of many people’s summer activities, and with the advent of the inflatable pool this has become even more commonplace. Most people think that because they have an inflatable pool, they do not have to take the same precautions as those with permanently installed pools. This couldn’t be farther from the truth. Although these inflatable pools can be taken down relatively easily, the same dangers that surround permanently installed pools apply to the inflatable pools.

According to the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) website, “Every day, about ten people die from unintentional drowning. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. Drowning is the sixth leading cause of unintentional injury or death for people of all ages, and the second leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 14 years.”

Drowning is a major issue in this country and people must be vigilant in their supervision of children in and around water. If you have an inflatable pool, you must take the necessary precautions to prevent a tragedy in your backyard. A removable ladder should be used to enter and exit the pool. It should be removed from the pool and stored where it cannot be accessed while the pool is not in use. If the pool is small enough where a ladder is not necessary, a fence at least 6 feet high should surround the pool to avoid accidents when you are not around. The gate should be self locking and self-closing to ensure it remains secure after entering or exiting the area.

The CDC echoes these sentiments. According to their website, “Barriers such as pool fencing should be used to help prevent young children from gaining access to the pool area without caregivers’ awareness. There is an 83% reduction in the risk of childhood drowning with a four-sided isolation pool fence, compared to three-sided property-line fencing.”

Based on the above figures from the CDC, it is safe to say that these simple measures can go a long way towards preventing a tragedy. Some of these options may be costly, but not as costly as the life of another.